Articles tagged with: research

Why I wiped HIV off my face

published: November, 10, 2015 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // Aging, Gay Men, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific , Mark S. King

Mark S, King is a long term survivor dealing with the effects of lipoatrohy – aka facial wasting. Here is how he has been dealing with it.

Why I wiped HIV off my face

Some years ago, I told someone that I was HIV positive before I agreed to his invitation for a date. “Yeah, I know,” he casually replied, and then he looked a little embarrassed, as if he shouldn’t have said it. It was too late, of course; I knew exactly what he meant. He could tell my HIV status by my face.  I had The Look. The sunken, wasted cheeks of someone living with HIV. It became a common manifestation in the 1980’s and persisted until the medications that caused the conditio

Starting ART on the same day as an HIV diagnosis in British Columbia

published: November, 05, 2015 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Health, Treatment, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource

From CATIE: Some readers may be surprised that the majority of newly diagnosed participants chose same-day initiation of ART. This will likely be the way that HIV will be treated in the years ahead.”

Starting ART on the same day as an HIV diagnosis in British Columbia

This article first appeared in Treatment Update, a publication of CATIE, here.   Une version française est disponible ici. It is likely that immediate HIV treatment will become the standard of care in high-income countries when this viral infection is diagnosed in the future. It is therefore important to assess programs that offer immediate HIV treatment in order to determine their effectiveness and the attitud s toward them by newly diagnosed people. Before we delve into the main part

Big improvement in life expectancy of older people living with HIV

published: October, 16, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, General Health, Research, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap reports improvements in HIV treatment and care have added an extra decade to this life expectancy. Now a 50 year old can expect to live to 73.

Big improvement in life expectancy of older people living with HIV

This article previously appeared in HIV Update, a publication of aidsmap, here.  Several studies have shown that, thanks to modern HIV treatment, the life expectancy of many people living with HIV in richer countries is now close to normal. But this primarily applies to people who are diagnosed and begin HIV treatment with a relatively high CD4 cell count, before significant damage has been done to their immune system. What about the life expectancy of older people living with HIV? In some

Volunteers wanted in Toronto

published: October, 10, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Research, Sexual Health, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

The National ENGAGE Study presents: An exciting volunteer opportunity for Gay/Bi/Queer guys – Come join our Community Engagement Committee!

Volunteers wanted in Toronto

Many recent advances in HIV research are changing the way we understand HIV transmission, prevention and treatment - especially among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM). Early HIV treatment has been shown to increase health outcomes and significantly lower chances of HIV transmission. New options to prevent HIV transmission such as PEP and PrEP are changing the way we think about safer sex. A new generation of young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men

Are you interested in having your opinion heard?

published: October, 06, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Research, Health, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

A new study looks at living with HIV today – the impact HIV has on you and your life, the treatments, the challenges and the unmet needs.

Are you interested in having your opinion heard?

Leger’s Healthcare Insights is currently conducting online research on behalf of pharmaceutical company Merck and with the help of the Canadian AIDS Society (CAS) and The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT), among people living with HIV as well as with physicians treating HIV.   The main objective of this research is to gather insights on the disease and treatment of HIV, and to assess how patient and physician perceptions and beliefs align.   More specifically, it is to assess satisfactio

Heard about HIV and bone density issues?

published: September, 18, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Research, Health, Living with HIV, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap reports on research that includes long-term follow-up of bone loss in people living with HIV

Heard about HIV and bone density issues?

This article first appeared in HIV Update here.   As the population of people living with HIV gets older, bone problems are becoming an increasing concern. Low bone mineral density and fragility fractures occur more frequently in people living with HIV than in other people of a similar age. Bone mineral density usually declines in the first two years after starting antiretroviral treatment. Studies have shown that the rate of fractures of the spine, hip and wrist is higher than in the gener

‘Undetectable’ is both a milestone and an identity for gay men recently diagnosed with HIV

published: September, 11, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // As Prevention , Gay Men, Research, Sexual Health, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Population Specific , Sex and Sexuality , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap reports on fascinating Canadian research which suggests reaching an undetectable viral load helped many men feel ‘responsible’ and ‘normal’, besides impacting identity and sexual decision-making

 ‘Undetectable’ is both a milestone and an identity for gay men recently diagnosed with HIV

This article by Roger Pebody first appeared in aidsmap.com here.   Achieving an undetectable viral load is a key milestone in the period after diagnosis with HIV, qualitative interviews with Canadian gay men suggest. Men incorporated knowledge of their own undetectable status into their identities as HIV-positive gay men and their sexual decision making, according to a study published in the August issue of AIDS Education and Prevention. Being undetectable helped many men feel ‘responsibl

Self testing not yet ready for prime time?

published: August, 04, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Conferences, Research, Sexual Health, Health, International , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap.com reports from IAS 2015: HIV self-testing may help the 'hard to reach' learn their status, but uncertainties remain

Self testing not yet ready for prime time?

This article by Roger Pebody first appeared on aidsmap.com here.   HIV self-testing (or ‘home testing’) is likely to have an important place in future global HIV strategies, but at the moment there are significant gaps in the evidence base of how it may best be made available, to which populations and with what kind of support. So while the World Health Organization (WHO) has clearly signalled its enthusiasm for the approach, its new guidance on HIV testing reviews what we know so far a

What you probably didn’t want to know about HIV and aging

published: July, 03, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Aging, Gay Men, Research, Health, Living with HIV, Population Specific , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap reports on research indicating geriatric conditions are common in middle-aged and older HIV-positive men

What you probably didn’t want to know about HIV and aging

This article by Michael Carter first appeared in aidsmap.com here.   Geriatric conditions were common in middle-aged and older HIV-positive adults in a San Francisco clinic, investigators report in the June 1st edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. Common conditions included pre-frailty, difficulties with activities of daily living and cognitive impairment. A quarter of patients reported falls or urinary incontinence. The authors were concerned that these condition

Very early symptoms

published: June, 12, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Newly Diagnosed, Research, Health, Living with HIV, Population Specific , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap reports on research which indicates a wide range of symptoms is seen at the time of seroconversion

Very early symptoms

This article first appeared in HIV Update, a publication of aidsmap.com, here.   In the very first few weeks after infection with HIV, some people feel unwell. Commonly reported symptoms at this time include fever, sore throat, tiredness, a skin rash, aching muscles and joints, swollen lymph glands and headaches.  These symptoms are the result of the immune system’s production of antibodies to HIV in order to mount a defence against HIV. This is known as seroconversion.  The symptoms

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