Opinion Pieces

The last question: could we possibly be human again?

published: May, 16, 2017 Written by // Dennis Battler Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, Dennis Battler, Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces

There's big money and status in HIV stigma. Dennis Battler writes about the sly ways the HIV-positive are marginalized and rendered invisible in gay media.

The last question: could we possibly be human again?

Photo: Jeff Stroud I follow Kevin Sessums on Facebook, a successful American author. Candidly speaking of his life as a former participant in The Factory of Andy Warhol, a “gay emeritus of the Vanity Fair staff”, and subsequent positions in media with unabashed personal trials and tribulations of being a gay man from the south moving in celebrity circles of stage, TV, fashion and media. A published author, his first memoir in 2007 “Mississippi Sissy” and “I Left It On The Mountain:

‘A near normal lifespan for people with HIV?’ For whom is this true - and who misses out?

published: May, 15, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Social Media, Aging, As Prevention , Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, General Health, Health, Smoking Cessation , International , Treatment, Megan DePutter, Opinion Pieces

Megan DePutter: "We can’t ignore these vulnerabilities that can put individuals more at risk both for acquiring HIV, getting diagnosed late, or struggling to adhere to the medication."

‘A near normal lifespan for people with HIV?’ For whom is this true - and who misses out?

Yesterday, the Lancet published a study titled ‘Survival of HIV-positive patients starting antiretroviral therapy between 1996 and 2013: a collaborative analysis of cohort studies’. This study found that ‘even in the late ART era, survival during the first three years of ART continues to improve.’ In fact, the authors found that ‘between 1996 and 2010, life expectancy in 20-year-old patients starting ART increased by about nine years in women and ten years in men.’ The authors con

Doors did open; it was magical!

published: May, 12, 2017 Written by // Jeff Potts Categories // Activism, Conferences, Gay Men, Jeff Potts, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Jeff Potts on a recent HIV conference, Eastern Ontario Opening Doors, that included “an unparalleled awakening, an awe-inspiring and emotional moment in time" - U=U and much more

Doors did open; it was magical!

The view from Glen House Resort, Gananoque We pulled up to the main entrance of the Glen House Resort, near Gananoque, Ontario  on a wonderful Wednesday afternoon, under sunny Springtime skies, and we were warmly greeted by a small group of early arrivers – most of whom I know; none of whom Paul had opportunity to meet before that moment. We registered for the 25th Eastern Ontario Opening Doors conference ready to participate together at an HIV-inspired event… simply as our sero-discord

CTAC Talks! U = U: The Undetectable = Untransmittable Campaign

published: May, 12, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Activism, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Women, Media, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

CTAC Talks is an innovative web series highlighting treatment access issues and solutions for Canadians living with HIV and Viral Hepatitis.

CTAC Talks! U = U: The Undetectable = Untransmittable Campaign

CTAC's expert guests, Dane Griffiths, Bob Leahy, Sandra Wesley, Sipiwe Mapfumo and Joshua Edward discuss the impact of the U=U campaign, which states that if a person has an undetectable viral load they cannot pass on the HIV virus. For more information, visit the Canadian Treatment Access Council (CTAC), here.

Is this the beginning of the end for HIV?

published: May, 11, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, As Prevention , Gay Men, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Current Affairs, Sexual Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From FS Magazine, Matthew Hodson writes on the importance of getting PrEP to those who need it.

Is this the beginning of the end for HIV?

The end of year reviews of 2016 were pretty damning. Bowie, Prince and George Michael led a long list of musical heroes who left us. Brexit in the UK and Trump in the US upset the pollsters and divided both nations. Worldwide, there was a succession of murderous atrocities committed, not least a bloody attack on a gay nightclub in Miami. And Princess Leia died. And then her mum died too. But just before Christmas there was one bit of good news. 56 Dean Street, the busiest sexual health clinic

CTAC Talks! PrEP: A Game Changer for HIV Prevention in Canada?

published: May, 11, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Social Media, African, Caribbean and Black, Hep B and C, Gay Men, Women, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

CTAC Talks is an innovative web series highlighting treatment access issues and solutions for Canadians living with HIV and Viral Hepatitis.

CTAC Talks! PrEP: A Game Changer for HIV Prevention in Canada?

CTAC's expert guests, Joshua Edward, Dane Griffiths, Sipiwe Mapfumo and Fanta Ongoiba discuss the impact of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, which involves the use of antiretroviral medications by an HIV-negative person to prevent possible HIV transmission. For more information, visit the Canadian Treatment Access Council (CTAC), here.

Transforming lives on the U=U campaign trail

published: May, 09, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Conferences, Activism, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy and Bruce Richman have been talking directly to people living with HIV. It can be an emotional and transformative experience on both sides of the podium, says Bob, as it was last week in Gananoque, Ontario,

Transforming lives on the U=U campaign trail

On transformative experiences We are accustomed to raw emotion, to tears even, in HIV workshop settings when the conversation turns to topics like grief and loss. That’s our history. But seldom do we see tears of joy or maybe something deeper, something hard to explain but clearly good, something akin to elation.  That happened in Gananoque, Ontario last week. “There is nothing better than being there when people living with HIV learn about #UequalsU for the first time” said the Preve

Remembrance of things past

published: May, 04, 2017 Written by // Michael Yoder Categories // Social Media, Aging, Gay Men, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Michael Yoder

Michael Yoder: "I fear that if we don't record our past, in each community, we'll end up with a Hollywood version that misses the point..."

Remembrance of things past

"Remember, the storm is a great opportunity for the pine and the cypress to show their stability" -- Ho Chi Minh I read an article online where the number of long-term survivors who choose to commit suicide is increasing. Besides the tragedy of this in and of itself, there is a deeper loss - the loss of the living library of people who remember the "dark days" of HIV. Living in a small city, I know that there are only a few of us left who remember the people and events of our local past. Pe

How HIV made me look at dating differently

published: May, 04, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Dating, Social Media, Gay Men, International , Lifestyle, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From FS Magazine, Ruaidhri O’Baoill on dealing with dating and stigma in the wake of his diagnosis.

How HIV made me look at dating differently

I recently met up with a friend of mine who laughed when I mentioned that I was writing my next article on relationships. I can’t blame him. I’m single. I’ve been consistently single for the past nine years. My relationship with relationships isn’t great. When I was younger I couldn’t wait until I was older so I could find ‘the one’. I was such a romantic. I would obsess over how we would meet. How he would propose. Where we would live and what our lives would be like. Even thou

A Second Chance at Death

published: May, 03, 2017 Written by // Mark S. King - My Fabulous Disease Categories // Social Media, Gay Men, Mental Health, International , Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Mark S. King

Mark S. King reflects on how his experience of the "plague years" of HIV have better prepared him to face his own mortality.

A Second Chance at Death

The angel visits, in the 1993 Broadway production of Angels in America. We all know how this ends. Despite the avalanche of articles on aging with HIV or advice about how to avoid long-term side effects or even news of progress toward a cure, nothing will change the inevitable. None of us will get out of this alive. And, in one of the bitter ironies of being a long-term survivor, my experiences during the worst of the plague years have become a handy point of reference. I have learned imp

Ed Wolf's journal of the Trump years for May: where to find relief while waiting for a miracle?

published: May, 01, 2017 Written by // Ed Wolf Categories // Social Media, Activism, Gay Men, Current Affairs, Ed Wolf, International , Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Ed Wolf: "Miracles happen, over and over and over again..."

Ed Wolf's journal of the Trump years for May: where to find relief while waiting for a miracle?

Photo by me of the home made time travel machine Day 36. Trust the street Thirty-six days since the United States got Trumped, 36-days of questions, over and over: What to do? How to hold up? When to let go? Where to push back? Who to read and who to listen to? And still the nagging question: “How did it happen?” I walk the streets, looking for answers, and come across this Time Machine. I stop. Somebody put five cents down and jumped through. Where are they now? On hold somewhere, waiti

The U=U movement: a global phenomenon

published: April, 27, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Activism, International , Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

The Prevention Access Campaign is scoring impressive gains around the world – but challenges still remain, writes PositiveLite.com publisher Bob Leahy

The U=U movement: a global phenomenon

The Supporters The Prevention Access Campaign’s website is the hub of the ubiquitous Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) campaign. It’s impressive. "Slick marketing", its detractors like to label it. Bruce Richman, the campaign’s founding light, would prefer to call it professional. And it is: campaign posters generated by supporting agencies from the USA, the UK, Italy, France, Greece, the Czech Republic, The Netherlands, Macedonia, Spain, Ireland and Turkey slide in and out of view.

2,100 miles on a bike: Barry Haarde is in the saddle again

published: April, 25, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Hep B and C, Fitness and Exercise, Features and Interviews, Lifestyle, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy talks to long-time HIV and Hep C survivor Barry Haarde as he prepares to tackle his sixth marathon bike ride to raise awareness and money for hemophilia

2,100 miles on a bike: Barry Haarde is in the saddle again

Bob Leahy: Hi again Barry. Tell us about your route you will be travelling this time.  Barry Haarde: After completing five trans-continental tours in the U.S., including last year’s 5,000 mile trek from Seattle to Key West in 60 days, we decided to change things up a bit and ride the length of the Alaska Highway. The ride starts at “Mile 0” of the AlCan route in Dawson Creek, B.C. and tracks northwest in to Alaska, finishing near Fairbanks. Then, I’ll be riding an additional 650 mile

The growing invisible majority and what do people aging with HIV really need?

published: April, 24, 2017 Written by // Bob Leahy - Publisher Categories // Aging, Features and Interviews, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Bob Leahy - Publisher

Bob Leahy talks to Realize’s Kate Murzin about our collective response to HIV and aging – what’s working, what’s not and why that’s important to know

The growing invisible majority and what do people aging with HIV really need?

Bob Leahy: Tell me about your job, Kate.  Kate Murzin: I’m the Health Programs Specialist at Realize,, formerly the Canadian Working Group on HIV and Rehabilitation, or CWGHR. My role here is focused entirely on HIV and older adults –on prevention and what makes people vulnerable to HIV who are 50 and older, but also on the lives of people who are living with HIV and aging with HIV who are older than 50. Kate, there is actually a lot of discourse about HIV and aging but I have to admit

Iris's story: "I thought the doctor must be mistaken"

published: April, 19, 2017 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Newly Diagnosed, Women, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific , Guest Authors

Finding out late in life you are HIV-positive can be a shock. Here is how Guelph, Ontario’s iris Budd handled it with the help of her local AIDS Service Organization

Iris's story:

Back in 2005 I ended up in the hospital, deathly ill. The doctor first thought that I had a brain tumor (cancer). I had been in a coma for 2 weeks and when I came out of it, I couldn’t use my left side, as it was paralyzed. The doctor diagnosed me and summoned my children to the hospital, because he said, your mother probably won’t live. They said they had to perform a brain biopsy, so they shaved a triangle out of my hair and drilled a hole in my scalp to take a small part of my brain.

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