Subscribe to our RSS feed

Popular News Stories

  • Republishing
  • BareBackRT.com  - the interview
  • Dead porn stars society: HIV heroes of the arts:  (6)
  • Surrendering my toaster?
  • Superfoods

Treatment

Jun24

Two million people with HIV started treatment in 2015

Friday, 24 June 2016 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // African, Caribbean and Black, Gay Men, General Health, Sexual Health, Health, International , Treatment, Revolving Door, Guest Authors

From aidsmap, Keith Alcorn on UNAIDS Global AIDS Update 2016

Two million people with HIV started treatment in 2015

At least two million people worldwide started antiretroviral treatment in 2015 alone, and 17 million people are now taking antiretroviral therapy, up by a third since 2013, UNAIDS announced on Tuesday.

The announcement comes ahead of the United Nations General Assembly High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS, to take place in New York from 8 to 10 June 2016. The High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS is intended to catalyse support for a commitment to achieve ambitious treatment targets – the Fast-Track approach. The Fast-Track approach seeks to accelerate the scale-up of treatment and prevention dramatically by 2020, so that:

  •  90% of people living with HIV are diagnosed by 2020
  •  90% of diagnosed people are on antiretroviral treatment by  2020
  •  90% of people on treatment have fully suppressed viral load by 2020.

As well as endorsing targets to reduce both infections and AIDS-related deaths to less than 500,000 per year, and to eliminate HIV-related discrimination, the draft declaration also seeks to win a commitment to increase funding for the HIV response from $19 billion a year to $26 billion a year by 2020.

The UNAIDS report shows that the number of people receiving treatment has more than doubled in every region of the world apart from Western Europe and North America since 2010. In eastern and southern Africa, the world’s most affected region, the number of people receiving treatment has more than doubled to 10.3 million since 2010.

Coverage – the proportion of people in need of treatment who receive it – has risen from 24% in eastern and southern Africa in 2010 to 54% in 2015. Coverage reached 55% in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2015 and 41% in the Asia Pacific region, but remains extremely low in Eastern Europe and Central Asia at just 21% in 2015.

Despite the expansion of treatment coverage over the past five years, new infections have stopped declining worldwide after dramatic reductions in the previous decade. Approximately 1.9 million people became infected with HIV in 2015. Whereas the number of newly-infected people has remained stable in most regions and has declined by 4% in eastern and southern Africa, the number who became infected in Eastern Europe and Central Asia has more than doubled over the past five years.

In order to achieve the targets set out in the draft declaration, infections in Eastern Europe must be reduced from around 200,000 per year in 2015 to 44,000 by 2020, and from around 950,000 per year in 2015 to 210,000 in 2020 in eastern and southern Africa.

UNAIDS says that if investments to reduce new infections and expand the numbers of people receiving treatment are not front-loaded over the next five years, there is a risk that epidemics will rebound in a number of lower- and middle-income countries and the world will fail to achieve the 90-90-90 target by 2030.

Modelling of the financial costs and benefits of the Fast-Track approach in South Africa, published this week in Annals of Internal Medicine, estimates that pursuing the Fast-Track approach would cost an extra $7.9 billion over five years and $15.9 billion over ten years – total increase of 14% assuming funding would otherwise remain constant at $2.4 billion per year. The extra investment would avert 2 million infections, 2.4 million deaths and 1.6 million orphans. Pursuing very rapid scale up of treatment would be highly cost effective for South Africa and would “offer a superb return on investment,” the authors say.

References: UNAIDS. Global AIDS Update 2016. Walensky R et al. The anticipated clinical and economic effects of 90-90-90 in South Africa. Ann Intern Med 165, published online in advance, 31 May 2016.

This article previously appeared on aidsmap.com here.

Arts and Entertainment Section

Activism Section

Current Affairs Section

Events Section

  • LGBT people unite with a sense of solidarity

    LGBT people unite with a sense of solidarity

    More reaction to the Orlando massacre. The UK’s Christian Dolan weighs in and says that fear cannot and will not weaken us as a community.
  • Orlando: a catalyst for change

    Orlando: a catalyst for change

    Michael Yoder says “small things - Pride flags being lowered, vigils held, mayors and politicians and celebrities speaking out across the planet, rainbow colours decorating monuments are of immense importance.”
  • Remembrance by candlelight

    Remembrance by candlelight

    Don Short “Without fanfare, I'm posting an excerpt from my revised poem written for a past AIDS Candlelight Memorial. It honors those whose lives were tragically shortened by AIDS in the 80s/90s, the survivors of today and the hopeful who await the cure

Features and Interviews Section

Health Section

International Section

Legal Section

Lifestyle Section

Living with HIV Section

Media Section

Opinion Pieces Section

Population Specific Section

Sex and Sexuality Section

MarketPlace