Subscribe to our RSS feed

Popular News Stories

  • Fuck poz guys!
  • Tom Hanks in Philadelphia Changed my Life
  • Canadian AIDS Society’s AGM and PHA Forum in Ottawa: some scholarships for HIVers available
  • Semen goes viral – or does it?

International AIDS Conference

Here is will you will find the latest information in Vienna coming out on new treatments, and when to start treatments. The conference runs from July 18 - 24.

This section provides you with all the conference-related articles published all in one spot. Other non-conference, including what is found here can be found on my (Brian Finch, founder and publisher) blog, Acid Reflux on PositiveLite.com.

Reporting on the XVIII International AIDS Conference sponsored by Gilead Sciences Canada.

Jul27

Gay men and condoms

Sunday, 27 July 2014 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // International AIDS Conference , Conferences, Gay Men, Research, Sexual Health, Health, International , Population Specific , Sex and Sexuality , Revolving Door, Guest Authors

Aidsmap reports from AIDS 2014 on research that says most gay men who don’t use condoms are mindful of HIV and attempt to reduce their risk

Gay men and condoms

This article by Roger Pebody first appeared on aidsmap.com here.  

Three-quarters of Australian gay and bisexual men who report unprotected anal intercourse with casual male partners say that they “often” or “always” employ some sort of risk reduction strategy with those partners. Many attempt to select partners who they believe have the same HIV status as themselves (serosorting); a significant proportion use condoms most but not all of the time; and smaller numbers practice ‘strategic positioning’ or withdrawal before ejaculation.

The study shows that a simple, black and white division of gay men into low risk ‘condom users’ and high risk ‘men who don’t use condoms’ is misleading. However that is sometimes the impression given by behavioural surveys.

Martin Holt of the University of New South Wales presented the data to the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne yesterday. It is derived from an analysis of the responses to two large-scale, cross-sectional community surveys of Australian gay and bisexual men in 2011 and 2012. A total of 15,615 completed the surveys.

Overall, 38% had no casual partners (and are not included in this analysis, even if they did not use condoms with their partner), 28% always used condoms with casual partners and 13% had no anal sex.

That leaves 21% who reported anal sex without a condom with at least one casual partner in the previous year – this group was the focus of the study.

Moreover as risk reduction strategies differ according to HIV status, the analysis made comparisons between the 2339 men who had tested HIV negative and the 603 men who were diagnosed with HIV. The small number of men who had never tested for HIV were excluded from the analysis.

Holt was interested in risk-reduction strategies the men used “often” or “always” with casual partners, including:

  • Condom use.
  • Serosorting (having a partner perceived to have the same HIV status) when having anal sex without condoms.
  • Strategic positioning when having anal sex without condoms – in other words, the HIV-positive partner taking the receptive position (bottom).
  • Withdrawal before ejaculation during anal sex without condoms.

HIV-positive men who didn’t consistently used condoms with casual partners reported serosorting (60%), condoms (22%), strategic positioning (17%) and withdrawal (15%).

HIV-negative men were more likely to report using condoms most of the time, but serosorting was still the most widely reported tactic (44%), followed by condoms (41%), strategic positioning (24%) and withdrawal (22%).

Three-quarters of men reported using more than one strategy; the strategies most commonly combined were serosorting and condom use.

There was a very strong association between using these strategies and disclosing HIV status to sexual partners. This was the case both for HIV-positive and HIV-negative men.

For example, for HIV-negative men, those who disclosed to some sexual partners were almost twice as likely to practice a strategy as those who did not (odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.39 – 2.21) and those who disclosed to all partners were three times as likely to have a strategy (odds ratio 3.43, 95% confidence interval 2.66 – 4.42).

HIV-positive men who always disclosed were seven times more likely to use these strategies (7.11, 95% CI 3.70 – 13.67).

HIV-negative men who had a regular partner were less likely to practice any risk reduction strategy if their partner was untested or HIV negative.

Martin Holt concluded that interventions should aim to improve the consistency with which gay and bisexual men employ risk reduction strategies. Men should be encouraged to disclose their HIV status, to make effective agreements with their regular partners about casual sex and to choose the best strategy in different scenarios. Alternative approaches such as PrEP are likely to be appropriate for those men unable or unwilling to use existing strategies.

References

Holt M et al. Consistent and inconsistent use of HIV risk reduction strategies by Australian gay and bisexual men who report unprotected anal intercourse with casual male partners. 20th International AIDS Conference, Melbourne, 2014, abstract THAD0101.

Arts and Entertainment Section

  • Evolve is just the beginning

    Evolve is just the beginning

    Our LA guy Kengi reports on the art show he organized that featured artists from every ethnic andeconomic background as well as people living with HIV, a homeless person - gay, lesbian, transgender and straight
  • In your face: AIDS posters confront stigma

    In your face: AIDS posters confront stigma

    From CATIE’s the Positive Side comes this article by Darien Taylor about how art and poster design has been used to educate people about HIV and work to eliminate stigma and prejudice
  • Visual AIDS:

    Visual AIDS:

    From CATIE’s Positive Side comes this article about Peggy Frank’s giant drug cocktail sculpture that uses more than 2,000 empty pill bottles to make its point

Activism Section

  • Evolve is just the beginning

    Evolve is just the beginning

    Our LA guy Kengi reports on the art show he organized that featured artists from every ethnic andeconomic background as well as people living with HIV, a homeless person - gay, lesbian, transgender and straight
  • Seven amazing things

    Seven amazing things

    From TheBody.com, seven amazing things human rights activist Michael Kirby said about HIV at the AIDS 2014 opening ceremony
  • An interview with Ron Rosenes, C.M.

    An interview with Ron Rosenes, C.M.

    Long-time survivor, witness and pioneer Ron Rosenes was recently made a member of the Order of Canada for his contribution to the wellbeing of people living with HIV. In this interview he talks about what the award means for himself and for the community

Current Affairs Section

Events Section

Features and Interviews Section

Health Section

International Section

Legal Section

Lifestyle Section

Living with HIV Section

  • Lost heroes: talking with a friend

    Lost heroes: talking with a friend

    New PositiveLite.com writer Philip J H Dawson interviews Peter J. Smit from The Netherlands about his work in HIV and AIDS and also how he got to work directly with plane crash victim Joep Lange who was heading for Melbourne and AIDS 2014
  • The push for a cure

    The push for a cure

    From CATIE’s The Positive Side “The search for an HIV cure is ramping up. So, just how close are we? Ann Silversides reports.”
  • Sort it out (#140)

    Sort it out (#140)

    FS Magazine says “When it comes to sex and relationships there is no such thing as a stupid question. Here are our answers to some of the things you asked us via the GMFA website".

Media Section

Opinion Pieces Section

Population Specific Section

Sex and Sexuality Section

MarketPlace