Articles tagged with: HIV treatment

Five big ideas to stop the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C in Canada

published: May, 25, 2016 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // As Prevention , Hep B and C, Conferences, CATIE, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Health, International , Treatment, Living with HIV

The CATIE Forum in October 2015 heard speakers from across Canada and beyond. Here are some of the recommendations they put forth.

Five big ideas to stop the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C in Canada

This article previously appeared on the CATIE website, here. Une version française est disponible ici.  by Andrew Brett Research over the past several years has opened up new possibilities for the prevention of both HIV and hepatitis C. From greater knowledge to newer technologies, we are now in a better position to prevent infections than we have ever been. But are we making the most of these new possibilities? That was one of the questions tackled at the CATIE Forum in October 2015.

Next stop: unknown

published: March, 22, 2016 Categories // Gay Men, Newly Diagnosed, Lifestyle, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Our Toronto guy Josh is changing jobs and his concerns about HIV drug coverage and security and he’s anxious and angry that his HIV status is intruding again

Next stop: unknown

This post is coming at a point where I’m feeling a lot of anxiety, so it might not be concise or even sensible. I needed to get my thoughts off my chest and out somewhere to try and calm down.  I’ve been considering changing jobs for some time now. I value the place I work; it does good things for vulnerable people, and the team that I am on is incredibly supportive and smart. I also have a manager who I value and respect. She’s the only one at work who knows about my status, and she

Poz identities

published: February, 17, 2016 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // CATIE, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

From CATIE’s The Positive Side, an HIV specialist says “What it means to live with HIV and to be on treatment varies dramatically depending on how and when you were diagnosed.”

Poz identities

This article by Dr. Lisa Barrett first appeared in The Positive Side, a publication of CATIE, here.   Une version française est disponible ici.  I have worked with a wide range of people with HIV since about 2000, first as a PhD student working in an HIV clinic and then later as an MD—from long-term survivors who were diagnosed in the ’80s and ’90s to those who learned they were HIV positive in the past six months, from people in their 20s to an 86 year old. What it means to live

Stigma in full-force

published: November, 25, 2015 Categories // Arts and Entertainment, Current Affairs, Television, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces

Toronto guy Josh reacts to the Charlie Sheen affair and addresses those hurtful reactions we all read. “I want you to know that your mean comments about Charlie Sheen impacted a person living with HIV” he says.

Stigma in full-force

Many of you have likely heard the announcement from Charlie Sheen that he is HIV-positive.  When I first saw #CharlieSheen as a top trend on Twitter, I immediately wondered what ridiculous statement he had made this time. When I clicked the hashtag and saw the news, I immediately felt two things: first, compassion. It’s not easy news to get, and it’s certainly not easy news to share. Second, I felt a sense of panic; I felt panicked because this is what people will be talking about. The w

The politics of side effects

published: August, 11, 2015 Written by // Samantha Categories // Youth, Women, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific , Samantha

Giving youth a hand. Our Samantha asks “Can youth already be long term survivors?” And if so, how can we better support these young people?

The politics of side effects

I recently heard youth with HIV describing themselves as long term survivors. The group I refer to are those who were born with HIV, now in their 20's, some of whom struggle with adhering to their medication regimen. Many have become treatment-weary and struggle in similar ways to adults who are long term survivors and who would like a break from taking pills every day. At least two of the youth described how they made decisions to stop taking medication completely with the end result being

Clinging to my [personal] pessimism

published: August, 10, 2015 Categories // Gay Men, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Ken Monteith on his long and personal journey with HIV meds - and why their continuing history of improvement has thrown a monkey wrench into his retirement planning

Clinging to my [personal] pessimism

When I was diagnosed almost 18 years ago with a CD4 count of 4, I didn’t really expect to be around this many years later. Oh yes, my doctor said all the right things about living as long as my friends (yes, even then!), but inside myself I didn’t really believe him. After all, I was kind of staring on the precipice and I’m not all that nimble.  I’ve done my part along the way, missing a handful of doses of my original Crixivan/d4T/3TC regimen — that’s three times a day fasting o

Medications: A love and hate relationship

published: August, 06, 2015 Written by // Guest Authors - Revolving Door Categories // Newly Diagnosed, Health, Revolving Door, International , Treatment, Guest Authors, Living with HIV

Some of us like talking about our meds. Guest writer RYU Matsumoto from The Philippines is no exception.

Medications: A love and hate relationship

I started taking “medications” when I discovered about my shingles and GERD. I really thought undergoing such medications will be the worst. It took me two weeks to finish my Aciclovir (my medication for shingles). My Omeprazole medication took more than two weeks. I stopped it, but I had to take it again after several days. I had to take more medications during my confinement, and they seriously took their toll on my body. I can feel it. I can really feel it.  QUADTAB Experience… Fai

Bad information and a rebuttal

published: July, 16, 2015 Categories // Gay Men, Newly Diagnosed, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Toronto's Josh says some (poz) writers make being HIV-positive sound worse than it is – and that’s just not helping anybody. So he fights back.

Bad information and a rebuttal

While browsing around on Twitter today, I came across an article written on HIVequal.org. The headline, 6 Life Sentences That Come With HIV, piqued my interest so I thought I would take a look. Instead of reading something informative, I found an article that to me was very divisive and plays to the very stigma that HIV Equal allegedly wants to see ended.  Financial Burden – I’ll give you that one (to some extent) Being Canadian, I can dispute the first of the six “life sentences” i

Quiet and alone

published: June, 17, 2015 Categories // Dating, Gay Men, Lifestyle, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Toronto's Josh reflects, post-relationship, on the quiet moments and what they mean to him

Quiet and alone

All my life, I’ve been a quiet person when it comes to talking about my relationships and love life. I’m intensely private, and to be honest, I don’t know why. Logically, I’m aware that love is something that should be celebrated and shared. But it’s not something I’m comfortable doing.  It didn’t help that Alex didn’t want to meet my friends (and to be honest, I was okay with it because it meant I didn’t have to talk about things with my friends – even my best friend). I

Mental health and an HIV diagnosis

published: May, 26, 2015 Categories // Newly Diagnosed, Mental Health, Health, Living with HIV, Opinion Pieces, Population Specific

Toronto's Josh says “I don’t think it comes as any surprise to those experiencing a recent diagnosis, but finding out you have HIV can take a toll on your mental health.” Read what he says to do about it.

Mental health and an HIV diagnosis

I don’t think it comes as any surprise to those experiencing a recent diagnosis, but finding out you have HIV can take a toll on your mental health. It’s a traumatic experience – particularly if you aren’t expecting it.  My coping mechanism was to go on with life as normal; the day after I found out, I was at my desk at work, working a full day and I somehow made it through. If you ask me what I did that day, I couldn’t answer you – but it was important to me to push through. Sit

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