Articles tagged with: HIV and motherhood

Chatty CATIE: What is the one thing you wish you had known when you were first diagnosed with HIV?

published: June, 15, 2017 Written by // CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource Categories // Social Media, As Prevention , General Health, Treatment Guidelines -including when to start, Newly Diagnosed, Mental Health, Features and Interviews, CATIE - HIV and Hep C Info Resource, Health, Treatment, Living with HIV, Media, Opinion Pieces

And, what advice would you have for someone newly diagnosed? For CATIE, RonniLyn Pustil interviews two people living with HIV.

Chatty CATIE: What is the one thing you wish you had known when you were first diagnosed with HIV?

BRITTANY CAMERON, 31 Peterborough, Ontario People living with HIV engagement worker, PARN Diagnosed with HIV: 2006, at 36 weeks pregnant I wish I had known that it would be OK. That I wasn’t the first HIV-positive woman to give birth, and I wouldn’t be the last. That HIV-positive women can and do have HIV-negative babies. That one day, advocating for women with HIV to have babies would become a passion of mine and I would inspire other positive women to have babies of their own. I

Breastfeeding with an undetectable viral load: what do we know?

published: March, 07, 2017 Written by // Megan DePutter Categories // Social Media, Women, Health, International , Megan DePutter

Megan DePutter on why undetectable does not equal untransmittable in the case of breastfeeding, but why women should be supported to make an informed choice anyway

Breastfeeding with an undetectable viral load: what do we know?

I’m not a mother and sometimes I think that when it comes to breastfeeding I should just keep my big trap shut. I have started and stopped this blog so many times. But I’ve decided to write it and here’s why. I don’t think women are given enough information about breastfeeding. And I don’t think their choices are respected enough. I believe that women should be empowered to make their own choices about breastfeeding and they should be supported – not policed – in these decision